My TBR: All the Physical Unread Books I Own!

I don’t like to own a lot of books.

Actually, I don’t like to own a lot of books that I never read. When I own a book for too long, I begin to no longer want to read it anymore. I wish I was the person that can own a book for years and be like, “hey, this sounds interesting now.” So, I get rid of them. That’s why my book shelf is so slim. If I ever change my mind, I can just go to the library, simple and easy (and cost effective).

However, with these books, I have actually own for a while. Over a year! And surprisingly, I’m still excited to read these!

Here are all of my physical books that I still want to read!

EBDE2CF6-8D6E-45A6-B2D3-1F86602124C4.JPGBinti by Nnedi Okorafor

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor

Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay —–> my queen

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

Ask a Queer Chick by Linday King-Miller

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Binti:  I’ve read the first 20 pages or so and I was actually enjoying it! I got so caught up with school and completely forgot to pick it up again.

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry: I read a good portion of this book in middle school…yes that long ago and I would love to finish it

Bad Feminist: I’m trying to read everything by Roxane Gay and I have yet to read her most acclaimed book! Oops!

The Blues Eye: I’ve Read Sula by Morrison and I absolutely loved it. Complex women of color characters to shocking events, the book was just mesmerizing. I want to read more by Toni Morrison!

Ask a Queer: *shrugs*

Americanah: Again, I’ve read other books by Adiche and fell in love with them. She has become one of my favorite authors but I have yet to read her most popular novel.

Have you read any of these books? If so, what are your thoughts? Should I give up on any of these?

 

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“Why Party When You Can Read?”| #1

I’m a college student yet I never go out during the weekends to these parties hosted by the frat houses (okay people in greek life low-key scare me). So this is a knock off version of my Friday Reads since I will be mostly be reading. Oh, I am also working 10pm-5am tonight so please send some positive vibes lmao.

So, here’s what I’m reading this weekend

25526296Children have always disappeared under the right conditions; slipping through the shadows under a bed or at the back of a wardrobe, tumbling down rabbit holes and into old wells, and emerging somewhere… else.

But magical lands have little need for used-up miracle children.

Nancy tumbled once, but now she’s back. The things she’s experienced… they change a person. The children under Miss West’s care understand all too well. And each of them is seeking a way back to their own fantasy world.

But Nancy’s arrival marks a change at the Home. There’s a darkness just around each corner, and when tragedy strikes, it’s up to Nancy and her new-found schoolmates to get to the heart of the matter. No matter the cost.


25667918Her name is Binti, and she is the first of the Himba people ever to be offered a place at Oomza University, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy. But to accept the offer will mean giving up her place in her family to travel between the stars among strangers who do not share her ways or respect her customs.

Knowledge comes at a cost, one that Binti is willing to pay, but her journey will not be easy. The world she seeks to enter has long warred with the Meduse, an alien race that has become the stuff of nightmares. Oomza University has wronged the Meduse, and Binti’s stellar travel will bring her within their deadly reach.

If Binti hopes to survive the legacy of a war not of her making, she will need both the gifts of her people and the wisdom enshrined within the University, itself – but first she has to make it there, alive.


25733577Ask a Queer Chick is a guide to sex, love, and life for lesbian, gay, bi, and queer women. Based on the long-running and popular advice column for The Hairpin, but featuring entirely new content, Ask a Queer Chick cuts through all of the bizarre conditioning imparted by parents, romantic comedies, and The L Word to help queer readers and their straight/cis friends navigate this changing world. Offering advice on everything from coming out to getting your first gay haircut to walking down the aisle, Ask a Queer Chick is a positive, down-to-earth guide that will resonate with readers of Dan Savage and Cheryl Strayed’s Tiny Beautiful Things