Bi Recommendations #2|Making Wishes and Solving Murders

I thought I would start a new series where I recommend 2 books that have bisexual main characters. I hope that I can convince more people to read these books, especially fellow bi people as we don’t get represented nearly enough! Not all the books I mentioned in the posts are perfect (plot, writing, character development, etc.) but the books I suggest are going to be books that I personally believe write bi folks in a represented way.

Bi Recommendations #1

I’ve read a good amount of books with bi characters so expect a lot more of these in the future (will try to do either weekly or biweekly!)

ALSO HAPPY BI-VISIBILITY DAY!!!

How to Make a WishHow To Make a Wish by Ashley Herring Black

All seventeen year-old Grace Glasser wants is her own life. A normal life in which she sleeps in the same bed for longer than three months and doesn’t have to scrounge for spare change to make sure the electric bill is paid. Emotionally trapped by her unreliable mother, Maggie, and the tiny cape on which she lives, she focuses on her best friend, her upcoming audition for a top music school in New York, and surviving Maggie’s latest boyfriend—who happens to be Grace’s own ex-boyfriend’s father.

Her attempts to lay low until she graduates are disrupted when she meets Eva, a girl with her own share of ghosts she’s trying to outrun. Grief-stricken and lonely, Eva pulls Grace into midnight adventures and feelings Grace never planned on. When Eva tells Grace she likes girls, both of their worlds open up. But, united by loss, Eva also shares a connection with Maggie. As Grace’s mother spirals downward, both girls must figure out how to love and how to move on

INITIAL THOUGHTS: A quick but impactful read that deals with love, grief, friendship, and a teenager filling the shoes of a parent.

TW/CW: Death of Parent(s), Parent Neglect, Alcoholism Drunk Driving

REPRESENTATION: Grace: Identifies as Bisexual (On page), Eva: Biracial (Black/White), Lesbian.

Themes: Healthy conversations regarding bisexuality, rehab is seen in a more positive light. Dealing with toxic people, especially if they are a part of your family. Intersectionality is also discussed.

My Personal Star Rating: 4/5 Stars

Why YOU should read this: If you like Nina Lacour’s We Are Okay, I think you would absolutely love this book. The book explores dysfunctional family dynamics and the struggles of being there for your toxic loved ones. I think anyone can relate to having toxic people in your life and not wanting to let them go, even though they bring you down with them. Of course, the romance is cute. Although this book is quiet, many parts actually made me laugh out loud. Overall, this book will make you feel a lot of emotions.

Any Gripes: I feel like this is a cop-out of a gripe, but I, do wish this was like 100 pages long. I loved reading about not just the relationship between Grace and Eva but Grace and her best friend, Luca as well.

Favorite Quotes

 God, I’m dizzy, because like I said, it can be a guessing game with girls. A constant push and pull of hope so you’re not disappointed

Here’s the thing about wishes: they’re always changing on you. They’re either dying out, or they’re realized, and then they’re not wishes anymore. They’re only truly alive in their anticipation

For a long time, when I was a little younger, I thought that was how every girl saw other girls— this mix between beauty and awe and curiosity, a thin layer of lust just underneath. Took until I was fourteen to realize that no, the way I thought about other girls was a little different.

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The Last Place You Look (Roxane Weary, #1)Roxane Weary Series by Kristen Lepionka

Sarah Cook, a beautiful blonde teenager disappeared fifteen years ago, the same night her parents were brutally murdered in their suburban Ohio home. Her boyfriend Brad Stockton – black and from the wrong side of the tracks – was convicted of the murders and sits on death row, though he always maintained his innocence. With his execution only weeks away, his devoted sister, insisting she has spotted Sarah at a local gas station, hires PI Roxane Weary to look again at the case.

Reeling from the recent death of her cop father, Roxane finds herself drawn to the story of Sarah’s vanishing act, especially when she thinks she’s linked Sarah’s disappearance to one of her father’s unsolved murder cases involving another teen girl. Despite her self-destructive tendencies, Roxane starts to hope that maybe she can save Brad’s life and her own.

INITIAL THOUGHTS:  A compelling thriller that features a proud bisexual private investigator. Do I need to say more?

TW/CW: Sexual Abuse, Verbal Abuse, Rape, Sexism, Racism, Death of Parent, Alcoholism

Representation: Roxane: A bisexual private investigator. Some other queer side characters

Themes: There’s some discussion about biracial relationships, mainly when a black man dates a white woman.  The book also deals with gender roles and expectations.

My Personal Star Rating: 4/5 Stars

Why YOU should read this: Maybe it’s just me, but I find it challenging to find queer adult thrillers/mysteries so when I stumbled across this one, I immediately picked it up. However, I was nervous to pick it up because I’ve grown tired of the “aloof but snarky female detective who basically sasses everyone for no reason (I still love you, Jessica Jones).” Roxane was not like this at all. She was empathetic, strong but flawed and does indeed try to do good to others. She’s someone you can easily root for. The mystery of this book was pretty compelling, especially since there is a time constraint. Just an FYI, this is more mystery than a thriller. I hope publishers will continue to release more thrillers/mysteries with queer characters because there’s defiantly not enough out there.

Any Gripes: *sighs* there’s sort of a love triangle. However, it isn’t that bad and definitely isn’t the main plot of the book (VERY minor side plot).

Favorite Quotes

Trying to force a connection hadn’t gone very well for me before. But sometimes the connection insists on making itself. The universe sends you the same lesson over and over until you learn it. The world is a series of patterns on its own; the coincidence is only in the discovery of them.

of course

Be nice, but not too fucking nice.


Have you read any of these books? Do you have any recommendations for books with bi representation? Let me know so I can check them out!

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Bi Recommendations #1|Comic Book Convention + Futuristic World

I thought I would start a new series where I recommend 2-4 books that has bisexual main characters. I hope that I can convince more people to read these books, especially fellow bi people as we don’t get represented nearly enough! Not all the books I mentioned in the posts are perfect (plot, writing, character development, etc.) but the books I mention are going to be books that I personally believe write bi folks in a represented way.

Queens of GeekQueens of Geek by Jen Wilde

Charlie likes to stand out. She’s a vlogger and actress promoting her first movie at SupaCon, and this is her chance to show fans she’s over her public breakup with co-star Reese Ryan. When internet-famous cool-girl actress Alyssa Huntington arrives as a surprise guest, it seems Charlie’s long-time crush on her isn’t as one-sided as she thought.

Taylor likes to blend in. Her brain is wired differently, making her fear change. And there’s one thing in her life she knows will never change: her friendship with her best guy friend Jamie—no matter how much she may secretly want it to. But when she hears about a fan contest for her favorite fandom, she starts to rethink her rules on playing it safe.

INITIAL THOUGHTS: This was INCREDIBLY adorable.

TW/CW: Fatphobia, Biphobia

REPRESENTATION: Charlie: Chinese-Australian vlogger/actress who identifies as Bisexual, Taylor: Has autism spectrum disorder, anxiety, plus size, Varies of other characters who are poc, queer, mental+physical disabilities.

Themes: Issues that come up includes body positively, overcoming bisexuality/queer stereotypes, dealing with anxiety, trusting of friends and accepting who you are. The book also dives into change, especially transitioning from high school to college and how to cope with that change  Also, all the people who said problematic things were immediately challenged.

My Personal Star Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

Why YOU should read this: This was a highly entertaining read but it also delve into important discussions that I believe teenagers desperately need. One part that made me a little emotional was when Taylor saw herself in a comic because as an aspie, she doesn’t get represented nearly enough. That’s why I believe that more diverse books that has queer, persons of color, different religions, and persons with disability MAIN characters are needed, especially in YA. Many teenagers read YA to explore new worlds but also connect with character but only seeing one archetype (white, cis, able-body, etc) paints a problematic picture on who can be a hero or who can fall in love or who can be a problem solver.

Any Gripes: Cheesy writing+Dialogue. The parts where the important topics discussed weren’t consistent to the dialogue in terms of writing style.

Favorite Quotes

“Things that most people consider to be normal, daily parts of our life are the very things we fear and struggle with the most, and yet here we are, moving forward anyway. That’s not weak…we are the brave ones”

“I pull the plastic red handgun out of the holster and get ready. A selection of avatars appear, and I’m thrilled to see I’m one of them. Me. The geek-girl from the suburbs of Melbourne. The youngest daughter of Chinese immigrants. The only openly bi kid at school. The drama freak who makes vlogs in her bedroom. I’m the hero. Finally, I feel like the rest of the world is starting to see me the way I’ve always seen myself.”

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Not Your Sidekick (Sidekick Squad, #1)Not Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee

Welcome to Andover… where superpowers are common, but internships are complicated. Just ask high school nobody, Jessica Tran. Despite her heroic lineage, Jess is resigned to a life without superpowers and is merely looking to beef-up her college applications when she stumbles upon the perfect (paid!) internship—only it turns out to be for the town’s most heinous supervillain. On the upside, she gets to work with her longtime secret crush, Abby, who Jess thinks may have a secret of her own. Then there’s the budding attraction to her fellow intern, the mysterious “M,” who never seems to be in the same place as Abby. But what starts as a fun way to spite her superhero parents takes a sudden and dangerous turn when she uncovers a plot larger than heroes and villains altogether.

INITIAL THOUGHTS: The swoon-worthy romance was top-notched

TW/CW: Racism, racial stereotyping

Representation: Jess: Biracial/ Vietnamese-Chinese American who identifies as bisexual. Other LGBT and POC side characters

Themes: Heroism vs. Villianism,  Invisibility of bi people especially n LGBT+ organizations, inclusiveness,  friendship, trusting of friends, biracial problems

My Personal Star Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

Why YOU should read this: This books offers an unique cast of characters that you grow to love at the end. I also thought the world was cleverly written and  I thought the class system was easy to understand.  However, the romance is what really made this book shine for me. Jess and her love interest Abby were just the cutest and I love their scenes. I’m not going to lie, I would sometimes quickly scan a page until I see dialogue between them because they were just adorable. I also related to Jess a lot when it came to her LGBT club at school and how she felt excluded because she wasn’t considered “gay” enough. I also have those feelings so it was nice to know that I’m not completely alone when it comes to these organizations.

Any Gripes: This felt more middle grade than YA to me. The writing just seemed more juvenile but that might be because the world is kind of juvenile?!?! Also, this was pretty predicable in terms of some of the revealings and I’m really bad at predictions. I was unfortunately right on like all of them so there really wasn’t any shock value in this book for me.

Favorite Quotes

“Jess often feels as if she’s not Chinese enough in certain situations and not Vietnamese enough in others. It’s awkward when you’re not quite one but not quite the other.”

Have you read any of these books? Do you have any recommendations for books with bi representation? Let me know so I can check them out!

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